Fair Trial

The Situation of Human Rights in Lebanon -2017

In 2017, Lebanese Parliament amended and passed several laws that improve human rights in Lebanon and reaffirm the realization of several efforts by Lebanese civil society in areas concerning elections, transparency, women’s rights, and torture prevention. Recent legislative reforms include changing the electoral law and the prohibition of marital rape, as well as the criminalization [...]

Rights to a future: Threats to legal and physical safety (2017)

Currently, Lebanon hosts over 1.5 million Syrians and 500,000 registered Palestinian refugees1, amounting to the highest number of refugees per capita in the world. Even though the Syrian refugee crisis is in its sixth year and there is an abundant ow of international support, policy- makers fail to respond to the crisis adequately and in [...]

ALEF Annual Report 2016

As in previous years, the Lebanese government has taken some positive steps towards promoting human rights in 2016, but has missed several opportunities to uphold the country’s international obligations, and failed to address major protection concerns of the general population. The Lebanese criminal justice system continues to overlook many of the international standards set by [...]

Guarantees during Court Proceedings, Detention and Appeal

Through the adoption of contemporary international procedures, the Lebanese legal system in theory guarantees due process and fair trials.  The  justice system now allows for civil lawsuits without recourse to the Sharia, the right to legal counsel in any criminal case, and an absolute protection against “double jeopardy”—a defendant may not be prosecuted twice for [...]

Guarantees during Arrest and Investigation

The principles of a fair trial are preserved by a wide array of international agreements and conventions that apply to citizens as well as the state.  The most significant of which are the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). The state of Lebanon has ratified [...]

Exceptional Courts

In Lebanon, the concept of a fair trial is directly challenged due to the presence of several exceptional courts. Their presence creates a form of justice that is outside the scope of ordinary law, allowing for a judiciary that is separate and inexpedient,. This is embodied namely in the Military Court, the Judicial Council, the [...]

Annual Report 2015

The following report highlights Lebanon’s improvements and setbacks of the most pressing human rights issues in 2015. The Lebanese government has shown a willingness to comply with certain human rights matters, however it clearly lacks the capacity and funds to improve legislation, enforce laws, and report to the United Nations (UN) properly. With regard to [...]

Towards Realizing the Right to Fair Trial

European Union Contribute to increased fulfilment by the Lebanese authorities of their obligations with respect to human rights by ensuring fair trials. Better monitoring and documentation of violations of the right to fair trial in the Lebanese judiciary systems through establishment of new and improvement of existing mechanisms and tools. 2014 – 2016 Lebanese Center for Policy Studies La Sagesse University Human Rights Legal Clinic […]

Annual Report 2013

Lebanon’s 20th century civil war not only destabilized Lebanon, but also devastated the country’s development and protection of human rights. Its domestic legal order is now dysfunctional and often does not operate independently from the government. Today, the judicial system is subject to the whimsical decisions of statesmen and is constantly hijacked by opposing forces, [...]

Guilty Until Proven Innocent

Lebanon’s crippling, fifteen-year civil war and corrupt political system have created pitiable law enforcement practices and inadequate legislation that do not protect the rights and freedoms of the suspect, accused or convicted. Today, research has revealed that there is rampant arbitrary detention in Lebanon. Suspects are routinely held in police stations or courthouse holding cells [...]